coal ash impoundment

Toxic Coal Ash Threatens Groundwater Around the US

Above: Coal plants like the one above dispose of thousands of tons of toxic coal ash in unlined pits that leak contaminants, polluting vital groundwater. WORC network fighting to stop utilities from abandoning their cleanup obligations. Coal ash, the waste … Continued

youth grassroots organizing

Annika Johnson: The Future of Organizing is the Youth

For our 40th Anniversary, we hear from Annika Johnson, of Colorado’s Youth Voter Initiative about the importance of getting involved early. Annika Johnson participated in Western Colorado Alliance for Community Action’s Youth Voter Initiative during the 2018 election cycle. She … Continued

founder of WORC

Pat Sweeney: 40 Years of Grassroots Action

WORC founder Pat Sweeney tells the story of four decades of grassroots organizing around western issues like responsible fossil fuel development, agriculture and food, renewable energy, and rural prosperity. Not only does he detail forty years of winning on issues, he also describes what grassroots organizing might look like over the next generation.

coal mine cleanup

Who will pay to clean up coal strip mines?

WORC set out to investigate what the western coal industry’s continued decline means for cleanup of the hundreds of square miles of coal mines that stretch from North Dakota to Navajo Nation. As long-time coal companies are replaced by unknown firms without track records in the region, what has happened to the companies guaranteeing mine cleanup?

protesters in mcallen, tx

On the Ground with the Before the Border Protest

Western Native Voice Stands Against Border Wall And Concentration Camps Western Native Voice (WNV) staff and members attended the 2019 Native Voice Network (NVN) meeting and protest in McAllen, Texas, July 25-27th. The NVN chose to hold this gathering in … Continued

coal ash breach

Coal Ash Rule Rollbacks Keep Rolling In

The Trump Administration is accelerating its efforts to dismantle the few regulatory barriers that protect the public from toxic coal ash waste. Minerals in coal ash (the ash left over after burning coal) including arsenic, mercury, thallium, lead, and many other elements make coal ash one of the most dangerous pollutants in America, causing respiratory illness, neurological damage, and cancer.